Open Files II: Celebrating 5 Years of Collecting

Showcasing some of the most unique, historic, and fun artifacts acquired during the past five years, Open Files II: Celebrating 5 Years of Collecting includes 100 diverse objects from the World Chess Hall of Fame's permanent collection.

Though it has only been in Saint Louis for five years, the WCHOF has a 30-year history spanning four locations throughout the United States. Open Files II is the second part of an exhibition cycle in our third floor gallery that shows how the WCHOF’s collection has grown in the time since its relocation from Miami to Saint Louis.

Highlights include materials related to the Saint Louis launch of the Boy Scouts of America chess merit badge; a rare Hungarian chess set made from sterling silver, amethyst, jade, pearls, and copper donated by the Traci L. and Arthur B. Laffer family; a gold medal from the 2016 Chess Olympiad (the first won by the American team in 40 years), chess-inspired artwork by Rafael Tufiño; and artifacts related to the career of computer chess pioneer, World Correspondence Chess Champion, and 1990 U.S. Chess Hall of Fame inductee Hans Berliner.

Artifacts featured in the Exhibition

Chess Olympiads are competitions that feature teams representing different national chess federations. The first unofficial Chess Olympiad occurred in Paris in 1924, and the first official Olympiad took place in London in 1927. Thirty years later, the first Women’s Chess Olympiad took place in Emmen, the Netherlands. Competitors can win medals both for their performances as a team or as individuals. The United States has a tradition of success in the biennial Chess Olympiad. Teams in the 1930s took first four times (1931, 1933, 1935 and 1937), and Grandmaster Bobby Fischer (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 1986; World Chess Hall of Fame, 2001) played on two silver medal-winning teams (1960 and 1966). More recently (1974-2016), the U.S. took first twice, second twice, and third eight times. Overall, the United States has won more Olympiad team medals than any other country except for Russia/the Soviet Union.

Commemorative Azerbaijani Rug Chessboard

Commemorative Azerbaijani Rug Chessboard from the 2016 Baku, Azerbaijan, Chess Olympiad

2016

18 1⁄4 x 16 in.

Chessboard

Gift of Mike Klein

Chess Olympiads offer opportunities for their host countries to promote their history and culture. FIDE Master Mike Klein received this decorative chessboard as a gift while covering the events of the 2016 Baku, Azerbaijan, Chess Olympiad. The board promotes the region’s long history of carpet weaving, which the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared to be an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2010. The border of this carpet chessboard has eight pointed stars, a common motif on these works.

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Team Bronze Medal from the 1974 Chess Olympiad

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Team Bronze Medal from the 1974 Nice, France, Chess Olympiad

1974

17 5⁄8 in x 2 1⁄2 in.

Medal with ribbon

Gift of Raquel Browne

The 1974 Nice, France, Chess Olympiad (June 6-30), celebrated the 50th anniversary of the World Chess Federation (Fédération Internationale des Échecs, or FIDE). Grandmaster (GM) Walter Browne was a member of the American team, which also included GMs Lubomir Kavalek (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 2001), Robert Byrne (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 1994), Samuel Reshevsky (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 1986), William Lombardy, and International Master James Tarjan. The group took team bronze in the competition, behind the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

International Master John Donaldson’s Team Bronze Medal from the 2006 Chess Olympiad

FIDE

International Master John Donaldson’s Team Bronze Medal from the 2006 Turin, Italy, Chess Olympiad

2006

3⁄16 x 2 5⁄16 in. dia.

Medal with ribbon

Gift of John Donaldson

International Master John Donaldson earned this team bronze medal for his role as team captain in the 2006, Turin, Italy, Chess Olympiad (May 20–June 4). Grandmasters (GMs) Hikaru Nakamura and Varuzhan Akobian made their debuts in the competition, joining a team that also included GMs Gata Kamsky (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 2016), Alexander Onischuk, and Yury Shulman.

International Master John Donaldson’s Team Gold Medal from the 2016 Chess Olypmiad

FIDE

International Master John Donaldson’s Team Gold Medal from the 2016 Baku, Azerbaijan, Chess Olympiad

2016

1⁄4 x 2 5⁄16 in. dia.

Medal with ribbon

Gift of John Donaldson

The 2016 Chess Olympiad marked both the first time the American team had won team gold in the Open Section in an Olympiad with Russian/Soviet competitors, and the first time the United States had won team gold in the Olympiad in 40 years. The team consisted of Grandmasters Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura, Ray Robson, Sam Shankland, and Wesley So, with Aleksandr Lenderman as team coach. International Master John Donaldson, who donated this medal, was the team captain.

Hans Berliner’s Letter of Clearance and Pin from the 1952 Chess Olympiad

Hans Berliner’s Letter of Clearance from the United States Army Air Force Allowing Him to Participate in the 1952 Helsinki Chess Olympiad

July 25, 1952

10 7⁄16 x 7 15 ⁄16 in.

Correspondence

Gift of Carl Ebeling

 

Pin from the 1952 Helsinki Chess Olympiad

1952

3 13⁄16 x 2 in.

Pin

Gift of Carl Ebeling

In 1952, Hans Berliner (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 1990), was serving in the United States Army Air Force when he was invited to be part of the 1952 U.S. Chess Olympiad team. He sought and received leave to travel to Helsinki, Finland, to compete as part of the team, which ultimately took fifth place.

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Team Bronze Medal from the 1984 Chess Olympiad

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Team Bronze Medal from the 1984 Chess Olympiad

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Team Bronze Medal from the 1984 Thessaloniki, Greece, Chess Olympiad

1984

Medal: 3 ⁄16 x 1 15 ⁄16 in. dia. Box: 1 x 3 15⁄16 x 2 3⁄4 in.

Medal with box

Gift of Raquel Browne

A dominant force in American chess, Grandmaster (GM) Walter Browne (U.S. Chess Hall of Fame, 2003) won six U.S. Championships, a feat only surpassed by GMs Samuel Reshevsky and Bobby Fischer. He earned renown as a tactician whose perfectionist nature sometimes led him into time pressure. However, his success was not confined to the national stage. He represented the United States in four Chess Olympiads, earning team bronze four times and individual bronze once.

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Individual Bronze Medals from the 1972 Chess Olympiad

Bertoni S.R.L. Milano

Grandmaster Walter Browne’s Individual Bronze Medals from the 1972 Skopje, Yugoslavia (present-day Republic of Macedonia), Chess Olympiad

1972

Medals: 2 1⁄16 in. dia.

Stand: 4 1⁄2 x 6 1⁄4 x 1⁄2 in.

Medals mounted on velvet and leather stand

Gift of Raquel Browne

Before representing the United States in the Chess Olympiad, Grandmaster Walter Browne twice competed on behalf of Australia. In 1972, Browne earned an individual bronze medal for his efforts. The medals on view here are part of his archive, which Browne’s wife Raquel donated to the World Chess Hall of Fame after his 2015 death.

Walter Korn’s Honorary Medal from the 1964 Chess Olympiad

FIDE

Walter Korn’s Honorary Medal from the 1964 Tel Aviv, Israel, Chess Olympiad

1964

Medal: 3 ⁄16 x 2 5 ⁄16 in. dia.

Box: 1 x 3 1⁄2 x 2 3⁄4 in.

Medal with box

Gift of John Donaldson

Though best remembered as the editor of several editions of Modern Chess Openings (1952-1990), Walter Korn was also an accomplished endgame expert. Korn was awarded the title of FIDE Judge for Chess Composition at the 1964 Tel Aviv, Israel, Chess Olympiad. Endgame studies and chess problems (mates in three, for example) are among the items that Korn evaluated as a FIDE Judge for Chess Composition.

Silver and Copper Enamel Chess Set and Board

Hungary

Silver and Copper Enamel Chess Set and Board

Early 20th century

King size: 3 1⁄2 in.

Board: 22 x 22 x 2 3⁄4 in.

Silver, copper, enamel, pearls, jade, amethyst, and wood

Collection of the World Chess Hall of Fame, gift of the Traci L. and Dr. Arthur B. Laffer family

One of the finest pieces in the collection of the World Chess Hall of Fame, this chess set is part of a centuries-long tradition of intricate Hungarian metal and enamel work. Made of sterling silver and copper and adorned by jade, amethyst, and natural pearls, the chess set depicts two warring armies, but is intended for display as a work of art rather than play. On the corners of the board, warriors holding spears stand at the ready. The sides of the board include enamelwork images of battles and coats of arms. Special care has even been taken to the storage space within the board box—metal chains cradle each of the pieces.

Photography by Michael DeFilippo

More information coming soon!

Downloads

Open Files II Exhibition Brochure